The importance of affective beliefs and attitudes in the theory of planned behavior:Predicting intention to increase physical activity

French, David P., Sutton, Stephen, Hennings, Susie J., Mitchell, Jo, Wareham, Nicholas J., Griffin, Simon, Hardeman, Wendy and Kinmonth, Ann Louise (2005) The importance of affective beliefs and attitudes in the theory of planned behavior:Predicting intention to increase physical activity. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 35 (9). pp. 1824-1848. ISSN 0021-9029

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

Standard theory of planned behavior (TPB) questions to elicit salient behavioral beliefs may elicit instrumental consequences of behavior, and overlook affective consequences. Two hundred thirteen English adults (35 to 75 years of age) completed a questionnaire that contained closed measures of TPB constructs, and open-ended questions that asked not only about advantages and disadvantages, but also what respondents would like or enjoy and dislike or hate about being more physically active. Beliefs elicited by affective questions were associated more strongly with a closed affective attitude scale. Beliefs elicited by instrumental questions were associated more strongly with a closed instrumental attitude scale. Closed measures of the standard TPB variables explained 48% of the variance in intention to increase physical activity, while affective attitude explained an additional 11% of the variance. Applications of the TPB should consider affective and not just instrumental determinants of behavior.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2015 08:20
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2020 00:37
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/55439
DOI: 10.1111/j.1559-1816.2005.tb02197.x

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item