Self-help educational booklets for the prevention of smoking relapse following smoking cessation treatment: a randomised controlled trial

Maskrey, Vivienne, Blyth, Annie, Brown, Tracey, Barton, Garry, Notley, Caitlin ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0876-3304, Aveyard, Paul, Holland, Richard, Bachmann, Max ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1770-3506, Sutton, Stephen, Leonardi-Bee, Jo, Brandon, Thomas Henry and Song, Fujian (2015) Self-help educational booklets for the prevention of smoking relapse following smoking cessation treatment: a randomised controlled trial. Addiction, 110 (12). 2006–2014. ISSN 0965-2140

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Abstract

Aims: Most people who quit smoking for a short term will return to smoking again in 12 months. We tested whether self-help booklets can reduce relapse in short-term quitters after receiving behavioural and pharmacological cessation treatment. Design: A parallel-arm, pragmatic individually randomized controlled trial. Setting: Smoking cessation clinics in England. Participants People who stopped smoking for 4 weeks after receiving cessation treatment in stop smoking clinics. Intervention: Participants in the experimental group (n = 703) were mailed eight booklets, each of which taught readers how to resist urges to smoke. Participants in the control group (n = 704) received a leaflet currently used in practice. Measurements: The primary outcome was prolonged, carbon monoxide-verified abstinence from months 4 to 12. The secondary outcomes included 7-day self#x02010;reported abstinence at 3 and 12 months. Mixed-effects logistic regression was used to estimate treatment effects and to investigate possible effect modifying variables. Findings: There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in prolonged abstinence from months 4 to 12 (36.9% versus 38.6%; odds ratio 0.93, 95% confidence interval 0.75–1.16; P = 0.524). In addition, there were no significant differences between the groups in any secondary outcomes. However, people who reported knowing risky situations for relapse and using strategies to handle urges to smoke were less likely to relapse. Conclusions: In people who stop smoking successfully with behavioural support, a comprehensive self-help educational programme to teach people skills to identify and respond to high-risk situations for return to smoking did not reduce relapse.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Uncontrolled Keywords: behavioural support,educational booklets,smoking relapse
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Faculty of Science > School of Pharmacy
Faculty of Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 13 Nov 2015 15:00
Last Modified: 21 Oct 2022 01:08
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/55211
DOI: 10.1111/add.13080

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