Primary and repeat surgical treatment for female pelvic organ prolapse and incontinence in parous women in the UK:a register linkage study

Abdel-Fattah, Mohamed, Familusi, Akinbowale, Fielding, Shona, Ford, John and Bhattacharya, Sohinee (2011) Primary and repeat surgical treatment for female pelvic organ prolapse and incontinence in parous women in the UK:a register linkage study. BMJ Open, 1 (2). ISSN 2044-6055

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Abstract

Objectives To determine the lifetime risk of undergoing pelvic floor surgery in a cohort of UK parous women and the re-operation rates for pelvic floor surgery, time intervals for repeat surgery and independent risk factors for undergoing primary and repeat pelvic floor surgery. Study design A register linkage study. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was lifetime risk of parous women in the UK undergoing pelvic floor surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP), urinary incontinence (UI), and rectal prolapse or faecal incontinence (RP-FI). Secondary outcomes were re-operation rates and time interval of repeat surgery for POP/UI, and independent risk factors for undergoing primary and repeat pelvic floor surgery. Results 34 631 women identified from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Database were linked with the Scottish Morbidity Records databases of NHS Scotland to assess relevant outcomes. The lifetime risk for women by age 80 years of undergoing any form of pelvic floor surgery was 12.2%. 2130 (6.2%) women had at least one pelvic floor surgery, of whom 407 (19%) had repeat operations. The median time intervals (IQR) between index and repeat UI and POP surgery were 2.80 (0.94-8.07) years and 3 (1.00-8.25) years, respectively. There is a reduced lifetime risk of pelvic floor surgery in women who had all deliveries by caesarean section (p

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial License, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non commercial and is otherwise in compliance with the license. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/ and http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/legalcode.
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 12 Nov 2014 16:48
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2020 23:32
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/50681
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000206

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