Stable isotope probing - linking microbial identity to function

Dumont, Marc G and Murrell, J Colin (2005) Stable isotope probing - linking microbial identity to function. Nature Reviews Microbiology, 3 (6). pp. 499-504. ISSN 1740-1526

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Abstract

Stable isotope probing (SIP) is a technique that is used to identify the microorganisms in environmental samples that use a particular growth substrate. The method relies on the incorporation of a substrate that is highly enriched in a stable isotope, such as (13)C, and the identification of active microorganisms by the selective recovery and analysis of isotope-enriched cellular components. DNA and rRNA are the most informative taxonomic biomarkers and (13)C-labelled molecules can be purified from unlabelled nucleic acid by density-gradient centrifugation. The future holds great promise for SIP, particularly when combined with other emerging technologies such as microarrays and metagenomics.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: bacteria,carbon isotopes,dna, bacterial,isotope labeling,phylogeny,polymerase chain reaction,rna, ribosomal, 16s
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Environmental Sciences
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 10 Feb 2014 15:24
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2020 22:50
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/47523
DOI: 10.1038/nrmicro1162

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