Associations of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and vitamin D pathway genes with prostate-specific antigen progression in men with localized prostate cancer undergoing active monitoring

Gilbert, Rebecca, Metcalfe, Chris, Fraser, William D., Lewis, Sarah, Donovan, Jenny, Hamdy, Freddie, Neal, David E., Lane, J. Athene, Martin, Richard M. and Tilling, Kate (2013) Associations of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and vitamin D pathway genes with prostate-specific antigen progression in men with localized prostate cancer undergoing active monitoring. European Journal of Cancer Prevention, 22 (2). pp. 121-125. ISSN 0959-8278

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Abstract

Current diagnostic tests cannot differentiate the majority of prostate cancers with a low likelihood of progression from the minority with more aggressive potential. We examined whether the measures of vitamin D were associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling time in men undergoing active monitoring. We examined the associations of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), and vitamin D pathway polymorphisms with PSA doubling time in 490 men undergoing active monitoring for localized prostate cancer within a UK population-based cohort study [mean follow-up 4.4 years (range: 0.3-7.6)]. Repeat PSA measurements were analyzed using multilevel models. There was no evidence that circulating 25(OH)D levels, 1,25(OH)2D levels, or vitamin D pathway polymorphisms were associated with postdiagnosis PSA doubling time. Stratifying the results by prostate cancer grade at diagnosis (high grade or low grade) did not alter the results. We found no evidence that either circulating 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)2D, or vitamin D pathway polymorphisms were associated with PSA doubling time in men undergoing active monitoring for localized prostate cancer. Future studies should examine the associations of variation in vitamin D with clinical outcomes (metastases and death).

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: aged,cohort studies,disease progression,follow-up studies,humans,male,middle aged,polymorphism, genetic,prostate-specific antigen,prostatic neoplasms,signal transduction,tumor markers, biological,vitamin d
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
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Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2013 01:00
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2020 21:55
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/43422
DOI: 10.1097/CEJ.0b013e3283584954

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