Beliefs about stressors alter stressors' impact: Evidence from two experience-sampling studies

Daniels, Kevin, Hartley, Ruth and Travers, Cheryl J. (2006) Beliefs about stressors alter stressors' impact: Evidence from two experience-sampling studies. Human Relations, 59 (9). pp. 1261-1285. ISSN 0018-7267

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Abstract

Participants from two samples (n = 31 human resources staff, n = 36 teachers) rated the extent to which they believed varying levels of a pre-defined stressor influenced positive affect, negative affect, and work performance. Participants then carried personal digital assistants for five working days, and provided data on levels of the pre-defined stressor and on momentary negative and positive affect. For both samples, momentary negative affect was more strongly associated with stressors for those participants who believed stressors caused them to feel greater negative affect. For both samples too, the association between participants’ momentary negative affect and average levels of stressors across the working week was moderated by beliefs concerning stressors’ impact on work performance.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: affect,emotion in organizations,job design,stressor appraisals,stressors
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Social Sciences > Norwich Business School
Depositing User: Elle Green
Date Deposited: 06 Mar 2012 14:54
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2020 19:41
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/37935
DOI: 10.1177/0018726706069768

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