Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection in European Union and European Economic Area countries

Pimpin, L, Drumright, LN, Kruijshaar, ME, Abubakar, I, Rice, B, Delpech, V, Hollo, V, Amato-Gauci, A, Manissero, D and Kodmon, C (2011) Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection in European Union and European Economic Area countries. European Respiratory Journal, 38 (6). pp. 1382-1392. ISSN 0903-1936

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Abstract

In order to ensure the availability of resources for tuberculosis (TB) and HIV management and control, it is imperative that countries monitor and plan for co-infection in order to identify, treat and prevent TB-HIV co-infection, thereby reducing TB burden and increasing the years of healthy life of people living with HIV. A systematic review was undertaken to determine the burden of TB-HIV infection in the European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA). Data on the burden of HIV infection in TB patients and risk factors for TB-HIV co-infection in the EU/EEA were extracted from studies that collected information in 1996 and later, regardless of the year of initiation of data collection, and a narrative synthesis presented. The proportion of HIV-co-infected TB patients varied from 0 to 15%. Western and eastern countries had higher levels and increasing trends of infection over time compared with central EU/EEA countries. Groups at higher risk of TB-HIV co-infection were males, young adults, foreign-born persons, the homeless, injecting drug users and prisoners. Further research is needed into the burden and associated risk factors of co-infection in Europe, to help plan effective control measures. Increased HIV testing of TB patients and targeted and informed strategies for control and prevention could help curb the co-infection epidemic.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Rhiannon Harvey
Date Deposited: 11 Jan 2012 14:40
Last Modified: 17 Mar 2020 14:44
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/36106
DOI: 10.1183/09031936.00198410

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