Phosphate and arsenate electro-insertion processes into a N,N,N ',N'-tetraoctylphenylenediamine redox liquid

Marken, Frank, Hayman, Colin M. and Bulman Page, Philip C. (2002) Phosphate and arsenate electro-insertion processes into a N,N,N ',N'-tetraoctylphenylenediamine redox liquid. Electrochemistry Communications, 4 (5). pp. 462-467. ISSN 1388-2481

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Abstract

The electro-insertion of ions is a well-known phenomenon, which allows the transfer of anions or cations across phase boundaries to be monitored and driven electro-chemically. Extremely hydrophilic anions, such as phosphate and arsenate, are not usually observed to undergo electro-insertion. It is shown here that at organic redox liquid\ water/electrode triple interfaces these anions can be forced electro-chemically to transfer into organic media. The transfer process of phosphate anions from aqueous buffer solutions into organic microdroplets of the redox liquid N,N,N',N'-tetraoctylphenylenediamine (TOPD) is pH and concentration sensitive. It is shown that phosphate is transferred in the form Of PO4HK- in the presence of phosphate buffer. Two distinct potential regions are identified and attributed to (i) interfacial redox processes at the liquid/liquid interface associated with deprotonation and (ii) bulk redox processes associated with anion transfer from the aqueous to the organic phase. The comparison of phosphate and arsenate electro-insertion processes suggests that arsenate is less hydrophilic and transferred into the organic phase preferentially. (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: systems,electro-insertion,voltammetry,triple phase boundary,arsenate,graphite-electrodes,phosphate,ion,microdroplets,liquid vertical bar liquid boundary,interfaces,voltammetry,ion exchange
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Chemistry
Depositing User: Rachel Smith
Date Deposited: 21 Jun 2011 10:51
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2020 20:49
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/32836
DOI: 10.1016/S1388-2481(02)00345-4

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