Smaller predator-prey body size ratios in longer food chains

Jennings, S and Warr, KJ (2003) Smaller predator-prey body size ratios in longer food chains. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 270 (1522). pp. 1413-1417. ISSN 0962-8452

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Abstract

Maximum food-chain length has been correlated with resource availability, ecosystem size, environmental stability and colonization history. Some of these correlations may result from environmental effects on predator-prey body size ratios. We investigate relationships between maximum food-chain length, predator-prey mass ratios, primary production and environmental stability in marine food webs with a natural history of community assembly. Our analyses provide empirical evidence that smaller mean predator-prey body size ratios are characteristic of more stable environments and that food chains are longer when mean predator-prey body size ratios are small. We conclude that environmental effects on predator-prey body size ratios contribute to observed differences in maximum food-chain length.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: sdg 14 - life below water ,/dk/atira/pure/sustainabledevelopmentgoals/life_below_water
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Environmental Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Rosie Cullington
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2011 08:32
Last Modified: 28 Apr 2022 16:32
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/31732
DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2003.2392

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