Detection of multiple enteric virus strains within a foodborne outbreak of gastroenteritis: an indication of the source of contamination

Gallimore, C I, Pipkin, C, Shrimpton, H, Green, A D, Pickford, Y, McCartney, C, Sutherland, G, Brown, D W G and Gray, JJ (2005) Detection of multiple enteric virus strains within a foodborne outbreak of gastroenteritis: an indication of the source of contamination. Epidemiology and Infection, 133 (1). pp. 41-47. ISSN 0950-2688

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Abstract

An outbreak of acute gastroenteritis of suspected viral aetiology occurred in April 2003 in the British Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship (RFA) Argus deployed in the Northern Arabian Gulf. There were 37 cases amongst a crew of 400 personnel. Of 13 samples examined from cases amongst the crew, six enteric viruses were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Five different viruses were identified including, three norovirus genotypes, a sapovirus and a rotavirus. No multiple infections were detected. A common food source was implicated in the outbreak and epidemiological analysis showed a statistically significant association with salad as the source of the outbreak, with a relative risk of 3.41 (95% confidence interval of 1.7-6.81) of eating salad on a particular date prior to the onset of symptoms. Faecal contamination of the salad at source was the most probable explanation for the diversity of viruses detected and characterized.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Rhiannon Harvey
Date Deposited: 18 May 2011 15:13
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2020 20:02
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/30874
DOI: 10.1017/S0950268804003218

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