Effect of upper- and lower-limb exercise training on circulating soluble adhesion molecules, hs-CRP and stress proteins in patients with intermittent claudication

Saxton, J. M., Zwierska, I., Hopkinson, K., Espigares, E., Choksy, S., Nawaz, S., Walker, R. and Pockley, A. G. (2008) Effect of upper- and lower-limb exercise training on circulating soluble adhesion molecules, hs-CRP and stress proteins in patients with intermittent claudication. European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, 35 (5). pp. 607-613. ISSN 1532-2165

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Abstract

Objectives: To investigate the effects of exercise training on levels of circulating biomarkers associated with the progression of atherosclerosis and risk of cardiovascular events in patients with intermittent claudication. Methods: Circulating levels of soluble adhesion molecules (sVCAM-1, sICAM-1, sE-selectin), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and stress proteins (Hsp60 and Hsp70) in patients randomised to a 24-week programme of arm- or leg-cranking exercise were compared with those in usual care controls. Results: Arm and leg exercise similarly improved lower-limb aerobic exercise capacity (20% vs 19%, respectively; P < 0.001) and maximum walking distance (30% vs 35%, respectively; P < 0.001). Improvements in training limb-specific peak oxygen consumption were attenuated for patients in the highest vs lowest quartile for circulating sVCAM-1 levels at baseline (3% vs 25% respectively, P < 0.001). Although circulating hs-CRP levels tended to be lower in the arm-cranking group (−1.55 [95% CI: −1.06 to −2.26] mg l−1), exercise training had no effect on circulating levels of soluble adhesion molecules or stress proteins. Conclusions: These findings suggest that high levels of circulating sVCAM-1 are associated with an attenuated exercise training response and that arm-cranking exercise may provide an effective stimulus for evoking systemic anti-inflammatory adaptations in patients with intermittent claudication.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Allied Health Professions
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Deposited: 25 Nov 2010 11:12
Last Modified: 24 Oct 2022 01:04
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/14812
DOI: 10.1016/j.ejvs.2007.12.007

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