Is looped nasogastric tube feeding more effective than conventional nasogastric tube feeding for dysphagia in acute stroke?

Beavan, Jessica R., Conroy, Simon, Leonardi-Bee, Jo, Bowling, Tim, Gaynor, Catherine, Gladman, John, Good, Dawn, Gorman, Peter, Harwood, Rowan, Riley, Jan, Sach, Tracey H. and Sunman, Wayne (2007) Is looped nasogastric tube feeding more effective than conventional nasogastric tube feeding for dysphagia in acute stroke? Trials, 8. ISSN 1745-6215

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Abstract

Background: Dysphagia occurs in up to 50% of patients admitted to hospital with acute strokes with up to 27% remaining by seven days. Up to 8% continue to have swallowing problems six months after their stroke with 1.7% still requiring enteral feeding. Nasogastric tubes (NGT) are the most commonly used method for providing enteral nutrition in early stroke, however they are easily and frequently removed leading to inadequate nutrition, early PEG (Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy) insertion or abandoning of feeding attempts. Looped nasogastric tube feeding may improve the delivery of nutrition to such patients. Methods: Three centre, two arm randomised controlled trial, with 50 participants in each arm comparing loop (the intervention) versus conventional nasogastric tube feeding. The primary outcome measure is proportion of intended feed delivered in the first 2 weeks. The study is designed to show a mean increase of feed delivery of 16% in the intervention group as compared with the control group, with 90% power at a 5% significance level. Secondary outcomes are treatment failures, mean volume of feed received, adverse events, cost-effectiveness, number of chest x-rays, number of nasogastric tubes and tolerability.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2007 Beavan et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Pharmacy
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Deposited: 25 Nov 2010 11:11
Last Modified: 31 Oct 2019 13:48
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/14249
DOI: 10.1186/1745-6215-8-19

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