Understanding suicidal ideation in psychosis: findings from the Psychological Prevention of Relapse in Psychosis (PRP) Trial

Fialko, L., Freeman, D., Bebbington, P. E., Kuipers, E., Garety, P. A., Dunn, G. and Fowler, D. G. (2006) Understanding suicidal ideation in psychosis: findings from the Psychological Prevention of Relapse in Psychosis (PRP) Trial. Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, 114 (3). pp. 177-186. ISSN 1365-201X

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Abstract

Objective: To examine the clinically important phenomenon of suicidal ideation in psychosis in relation to affective processes and the multidimensional nature of hallucinations and delusions. Method: In a cross-sectional study of 290 individuals with psychosis, the associations between level of suicidal ideation, affective processes, positive symptoms, clinical and demographic variables were examined. Results: Forty-one per cent of participants expressed current suicidal ideation. Suicidal ideation was associated with depressed mood, anxiety, low self-esteem, negative illness perceptions, negative evaluative beliefs about the self and others and daily alcohol consumption. Frequency of auditory hallucinations and preoccupation with delusions were not associated with suicidal ideation; however, positive symptom distress did relate to suicidal thoughts. Conclusion: Affective dysfunction, including distress in response to hallucinations and delusions, was a key factor associated with suicidal ideation in individuals with psychotic relapse. Suicidal ideation in psychosis appears to be an understandable, mood-driven process, rather than being of irrational or ‘psychotic’ origin.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: sdg 3 - good health and well-being ,/dk/atira/pure/sustainabledevelopmentgoals/good_health_and_well_being
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Deposited: 25 Nov 2010 11:09
Last Modified: 28 Apr 2022 00:15
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/12582
DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0447.2006.00849.x

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