How time and perceptions of social context shape employee absenteeism trajectories

Dello Russo, Silvia, Miraglia, Mariella, Borgogni, Laura and Johns, Gary (2013) How time and perceptions of social context shape employee absenteeism trajectories. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 83 (2). 209–217. ISSN 0001-8791

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Abstract

Although the impact of social influence on employee absenteeism is well established, almost nothing is known about the dynamic, temporal accrual of this influence. Latent growth modeling was used to trace absenteeism trajectories over 4 years for employees who differed in years of organizational tenure. As expected, higher-tenure employees exhibited flat trajectories while those with lower tenure (1–3 years) gradually increased their absenteeism to conform to the dominant norm of the organization. However, as predicted by theories of identification and social exchange, perceptions of social context moderated the latter effect. The more positive an employee's perceptions of top management, the lower his or her rate of increase in absenteeism. The more positive an employee's perceptions of work colleagues, the higher his or her rate of increase in absenteeism. Perceptions of supervisors were unrelated to the rate of change. The study clarifies how employees learn and adapt to organizational absence cultures.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: absenteeism,social norms,social context,latent growth modeling
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Social Sciences > Norwich Business School
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 17 Mar 2017 01:43
Last Modified: 25 Jul 2018 11:50
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/62991
DOI: 10.1016/j.jvb.2013.03.005

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