Hypnotherapy and therapeutic audiotape:effective in previously unsuccessfully treated irritable bowel syndrome?

Forbes, A, MacAuley, S and Chiotakakou-Faliakou, E (2000) Hypnotherapy and therapeutic audiotape:effective in previously unsuccessfully treated irritable bowel syndrome? International Journal of Colorectal Disease, 15 (5-6). pp. 328-34. ISSN 0179-1958

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Abstract

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is not always readily responsive to conventional therapy. Hypnotherapy is effective but time consuming and labour intensive. Preliminary data suggested equivalent value from a specially devised audiotape. Tape use is now compared with gut-directed hyponotherapy in a randomised controlled trial. Consenting patients (n = 52; 37 women) with established IBS were recruited to a 12-week study. All had failed dietary and pharmacological therapy. The median age was 37 years (range 19-71); median symptom duration was 60 months (8-480). Randomisation was to six sessions of individual hypnotherapy, or to the tape, with stratification according to predominant symptom. Symptom scores and validated psychological questionnaires were utilised. Twenty-five patients (18 women) received hypnotherapy, 27 the tape. Successful trance was induced in all hypnotherapy patients. By intention to treat, symptom scores improved in 76% of hypnotherapy patients and in 59% of tape patients (not significant). Amongst 45 patients providing a full set of symptom scores there was advantage to hypnotherapy, with a reduction in median score from 14 to 8.5 compared to an unchanged score of 13 in audiotape patients (P

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: adult,aged,colonic diseases, functional,female,humans,hypnosis,male,middle aged,pain management,pilot projects,random allocation,relaxation therapy,tape recording,time factors
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 06 Aug 2014 11:44
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2019 15:40
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/49570
DOI:

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