The influence of previous iron intake on the estimation of bioavailability of Fe from a test meal given to rats

Fairweather-Tait, S J and Wright, A J (1984) The influence of previous iron intake on the estimation of bioavailability of Fe from a test meal given to rats. British Journal of Nutrition, 51 (2). pp. 185-191. ISSN 0007-1145

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

Iron retention and its subsequent distribution from 3 g 59Fe extrinsically-labelled wholewheat four in rats given a low (8 micrograms Fe/g)- or high (566 micrograms Fe/g)-Fe diet during the previous 3 d was measured (Expt 1). The mean (with SE) proportion of Fe retained from wholewheat flour was 0.46 (0.04) in the group given the low-Fe diet and 0.15 (0.01) in the group given the high-Fe diet (P less than 0.001). There was no difference in distribution of absorbed 59Fe in the tissues examined. The procedure was repeated in rats given diets containing a range of Fe concentrations, groups 1-6 respectively: 8, 77, 136, 334, 566, 1270 micrograms Fe/g (Expt 2). The mean (with SE) proportions of Fe retained in groups 1-6 respectively were 0.60 (0.02), 0.34 (0.02), 0.30 (0.02), 0.20 (0.20), 0.17 (0.02), 0.09 (0.01). Regression analysis showed that Fe retention was a function of the logarithm of the Fe concentration of the diet consumed before the test meal (R -0.997, P less than 0.0001) where Fe retained (microgram) = 95 -28 log10 Fe concentration of diet. Rats were given a low-, medium- or high-Fe diet (8, 136 or 1270 micrograms Fe/g respectively) for 1 or 2 d instead of 3 d before measuring Fe retention from 3 g wholewheat flour (Expt 3). The mean (with SE) proportions of Fe retained in rats given the low-, medium- or high-Fe diets for 1 d were 0.45 (0.02), 0.25 (0.02) and 0.13 (0.01) (P less than 0.001) and for 2 d 0.47 (0.03), 0.31 (0.03) and 0.18 (0.02) (P less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: animals,biological availability,diet,intestinal absorption,iron,male,rats,rats, inbred strains,time factors,tissue distribution
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
University of East Anglia > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Research Groups > Nutrition
Faculty of Social Sciences > Norwich Business School
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 06 Aug 2014 11:42
Last Modified: 25 Jul 2018 09:50
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/49267
DOI: 10.1079/BJN19840022

Actions (login required)

View Item