Maternal Western-style high fat diet induces sex-specific physiological and molecular changes in two-week-old mouse offspring

Mischke, Mona, Pruis, Maurien G M, Boekschoten, Mark V, Groen, Albert K, Fitri, Aditia R, van de Heijning, Bert J M, Verkade, Henkjan J, Müller, Michael, Plösch, Torsten and Steegenga, Wilma T (2013) Maternal Western-style high fat diet induces sex-specific physiological and molecular changes in two-week-old mouse offspring. PLoS One, 8 (11). ISSN 1932-6203

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Abstract

Maternal diet is associated with the development of metabolism-related and other non-communicable diseases in offspring. Underlying mechanisms, functional profiles, and molecular markers are only starting to be revealed. Here, we explored the physiological and molecular impact of maternal Western-style diet on the liver of male and female offspring. C57BL/6 dams were exposed to either a low fat/low cholesterol diet (LFD) or a Western-style high fat/high cholesterol diet (WSD) for six weeks before mating, as well as during gestation and lactation. Dams and offspring were sacrificed at postnatal day 14, and body, liver, and blood parameters were assessed. The impact of maternal WSD on the pups' liver gene expression was characterised by whole-transcriptome microarray analysis. Exclusively male offspring had significantly higher body weight upon maternal WSD. In offspring of both sexes of WSD dams, liver and blood parameters, as well as hepatic gene expression profiles were changed. In total, 686 and 604 genes were differentially expressed in liver (p≤0.01) of males and females, respectively. Only 10% of these significantly changed genes overlapped in both sexes. In males, in particular alterations of gene expression with respect to developmental functions and processes were observed, such as Wnt/beta-catenin signalling. In females, mainly genes important for lipid metabolism, including cholesterol synthesis, were changed. We conclude that maternal WSD affects physiological parameters and induces substantial changes in the molecular profile of the liver in two-week-old pups. Remarkably, the observed biological responses of the offspring reveal pronounced sex-specificity.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2013 Mischke, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 12 Mar 2014 13:06
Last Modified: 09 Apr 2019 11:01
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/47628
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0078623

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