What is the best predictor of emotional distress; mindfulness, self-compassion or other-compassion?

Moore, Simone (2013) What is the best predictor of emotional distress; mindfulness, self-compassion or other-compassion? Doctoral thesis, University of East Anglia.

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    Abstract

    Aims and objectives. The aim of the current research was to explore the relationship of mindfulness, self- and other-compassion with emotional dysregulation and symptoms in a clinical population suffering from mild-moderate anxiety and depression.
    Method. In order to investigate the relationships amongst the variables of interest, a cross-sectional design was employed. Quantitative data were collected via five self-report questionnaires measuring mindfulness, self-compassion, other-compassion, emotion dysregulation and emotional distress (anxiety, depression and stress), in addition to demographic information. A total of 94 adults enrolled in Improving Access to Psychological Therapy groups completed the questionnaires.
    Results. Multiple regression analysis indicated that all three predictor variables (mindfulness, self-compassion and other-compassion) significantly predicted variance within the measure of emotional distress, with mindfulness holding the most predictive power. Only mindfulness and self-compassion significantly predicted variance within the measure of emotion dysregulation, with self-compassion holding the most predictive power. Mediation analysis showed that emotion dysregulation partially mediates the relationship between mindfulness and emotional distress. Additionally, mediation analysis showed that emotion dysregulation perfectly mediates the relationship between self-compassion and
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    emotional distress. Emotion dysregulation did not significantly mediate the relationship between other-compassion and emotional distress.
    Conclusions. This study was the first to empirically explore the relationship of other-compassion with emotion dysregulation and emotional distress. The current findings suggest that other-compassion was not as important as mindfulness and self-compassion in regards to emotion dysregulation. The role of mindfulness and self-compassion within emotion dysregulation and emotional distress supports previous research findings. It is argued that the current study‟s findings are supportive of theoretical accounts that explain mindfulness and self-compassion as mind-training tools designed to improve emotion regulation in order to reduce emotional distress.

    Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
    Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Norwich Medical School
    Depositing User: Brian Watkins
    Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2013 16:12
    Last Modified: 02 Dec 2013 16:32
    URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/45261
    DOI:

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