Variations in surface atemperatures: Part 2. Arctic regions, 1881–1980

Kelly, PM, Jones, PD, Sear, CB, Cherry, BSG and Tavakol, RK (1982) Variations in surface atemperatures: Part 2. Arctic regions, 1881–1980. Monthly Weather Review, 110 (2). pp. 71-83. ISSN 0027-0644

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Abstract

We describe annual and seasonal changes in air temperatures over high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere during the period 1881–1980. Trends (that is, fluctuations on time scales greater than 20 years) in the average temperature of the Arctic are compared with those of the Northern Hemisphere. Seasonal and regional departures from the long-term trends in the average temperature of the Arctic are identified. Spatial patterns of variation in the Arctic temperature field are determined by principal component analysis and the major characteristics of the time series of the dominant patterns are summarized. Trends in Arctic temperatures have been broadly similar to those for the Northern Hemisphere during the study period. The Arctic variations were, however, greater in magnitude and more rapid. The spatial pattern of change associated with the trend in Arctic temperatures is clearly identified by principal component analysis. It shows that the trends have, in general, been Arctic-wide, but that certain regions are particularly sensitive to long-term variations, most notably northwest Greenland and around the Kara Sea. There is some evidence that the pattern of Arctic cooling that occurred after 1940 was more complex than the warming that affected the whole Arctic during the 1920's and 1930's. Warming of the Arctic has occurred during the 1970's, but is not yet of sufficient duration to be considered long term, except, perhaps, in spring. The average temperature of the Arctic during the 1970's was equal to that of the 1960's, indicating a cessation of the long-term cooling trend but not, as yet, a shift to long-term warming. Short-term variations in temperature appear to be most pronounced close to major regions of sea-ice production and decay.

Item Type: Article
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Science > School of Environmental Sciences
Depositing User: Rosie Cullington
Date Deposited: 05 Jul 2011 15:57
Last Modified: 16 Jul 2019 11:30
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/33373
DOI: 10.1175/1520-0493(1982)110<0071:VISATP>2.0.CO;2

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